Review of The White Company

Many people neglect Sir Arthur Conan Doyle’s military and medieval fiction.  Prior to this, I have reviewed The Adventures of Gerard, which follows the sometimes grave and sometimes comedic adventures of a French dragoon during the Napoleonic Wars.  Now, I turn my attention to Doyle’s romance of the Hundred Years’ War: The White Company.  One senses that Doyle immersed himself in the period, both its history and its literature.  (In the preface to Sir Nigel, the prequel to this book, he lists some excellent resources on the medieval age.)  As far as this medievalist can tell, Doyle makes no factual errors on the equipment, weapons, clothing, economy, or habits of the people.

white-company

One does wonder whether he lets some of his ideas about the French Revolution get mixed into his description of the impoverished people of France and their wealthy overlords.  However, there can be no doubt that interminable war had reduced the people of France to a sorry state, even if not entirely reminiscent of late 18th century France.  One finds the character of the longbow men well delineated.  The chivalric attitudes of the nobles drop easily from the mouths of the characters, just as they would have from the knights of old.  At the same time, their chivalry adjusts to the real world situations in which they find themselves.

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